Sunday, 30 November 2014

When Indira Nehru turns Indira Gandhi

Rare Photos Of Indira Gandhi & Feroze Gandhi

I found this article. i hope this helps you a bit but no certain proof.

Indira Gandhi, daughter of Jawaharlal Nehru, became prime minister of India in 1966. Mrs. Gandhi was born on November 19, 1917 to Jawaharlal and Kamala Nehru.  She was named Indira Priyadarshini Nehru. She fell in love and decided to marry Feroze Khan, a family friend. Feroze Khan’s father, Nawab Khan, was a Muslim, and mother was a Persian Muslim.  Jawaharlal Nehru did not approve of the inter-caste marriage for political reasons (see http://www.asiasource.org/ society/indiragandhi.cfm).  If Indira Nehru were to marry a Muslim she would loose the possibility of becoming the heir to the future Nehru dynasty.  At this juncture, according to one story, MahatmaGandhi intervened and adopted Feroze Khan, gave him his last name (family name/caste name) and got the name of Feroz Khan changed to Feroz Gandhi by an affidavit in England. Thus, Feroze Khan became Feroze Gandhi.  Though Mahatma belonged to Bania/Gandhi caste (a business tribe) the proposal was acceptable to Nehru for political reasons. Indira Nehru married Feroze (Khan) Gandhi in 1942 and became Indira Gandhi, which helped her politically as daughter of Nehru (the first Prime Minister of the Indian Union) and daughter–in-law of Gandhi (the father of the nation) securing her place in the future Nehru-Gandhi dynasty (based on swordoftruth.com).    Another story, according to Mr. Arvind Lavakare in a personal communication to me, is that Feroz had a Parsi father whose surname was "GHANDI" not "GANDHI". That was made clear by an advertisement in a major English newspaper of Allahabad. It was Mahatma Gandhi who suggested to Nehru that Feroze's surname be spelt as "GANDHI" instead of the original "GHANDI". An RSS columnist wrote that "Ghandi's" mother was a Muslim, and since an offspring takes on the religion of its mother, Feroz ought to be considered a Muslim

Saturday, 29 November 2014

Unusual Journeys To School In The World

To the delight (or dismay) of millions, the school season is beginning in many countries throughout the world. But it’s important not to forget that, in some parts of the world, school can be a hard-won luxury. Many children throughout the world have to take the most incredible and unimaginable routes in order to receive the education that some of us may take for granted. This list we collected will show you just how determined some children can be when it comes to getting an education.
According to UNESCO, progress in connecting children to schools has slowed down over the past five years. Areas that lack suitable school routes can often flood, making it even harder for kids to commute. Dangerous paths are one of the main reasons why many children decide to quit school.
The solution might seem easy: build roads and bridges, buy buses and hire a driver. However, the lack of funds and recurring natural disasters in many countries make it difficult to provide children with the solutions they so desperately need.
(h/t: amusingplanet)

5-Hour Journey Into The Mountains On A 1ft Wide Path To Probably The Most Remote School In The World, Gulu, China

Image credits: Sipa Press

Schoolchildren Climbing On Unsecured Wooden Ladders, Zhang Jiawan Village, Southern China

Image credits: Imaginachina/Rex Features

Kids Traveling To A Boarding School Through The Himalayas, Zanskar, Indian Himalayas

Image credits: Timothy Allen

Pupils Crossing A Damaged Suspension Bridge, Lebak, Indonesia

After the story spread, Indonesia’s largest steel producer, PT Krakatau Steel, built a new bridge, so that the children could cross the river safely. (Image credits: Reuters)

Kids Flying 800m On A Steel Cable 400m Above The Rio Negro River, Colombia

Image credits: Christoph Otto

Pupils Canoeing To School, Riau, Indonesia

Image credits: Nico Fredia

Kids Traveling Through The Forest Across A Tree Root Bridge, India

Source: The Atlantic

A Girl Riding A Bull To School, Myanmar

Image credits: Andrey

Riding a Tuktuk (Auto Rickshaw) To School In Beldanga, India

Image credits: Dilwar Mandal

Crossing a Broken Bridge In The Snow To Get To School In Dujiangyan, Sichuan Province, China

Children Traveling On The Roof Of A Wooden Boat In Pangururan, Indonesia

Image credits: Muhammad Buchari

School Girls Walking Across A Plank On The Wall Of The 16th Century Galle Fort In Sri Lanka

Image credits: Reuters/Vivek Prakash

Pupils Traveling By Boat in Kerala, India

Image credits: Santosh Sugumar

Schoolchildren Riding A Horse Cart Back From School In Delhi, India

Image credits: Reuters

Students Crossing Ciherang River On A Makeshift Bamboo Raft, Cilangkap Village, Indonesia

125-Mile Journey To A Boarding School Through The Mountains, Pili, China

Image credits: unknown

Pupils Walking On A Tightrope 30 Feet Above A River, Padang, Sumatra, Indonesia

Elementary School Students Crossing A River On Inflated Tire Tubes, Rizal Province, Philippines

Image credits: Dennis M. Sabangan / EPA
Image credits: Bullit Marquez /AP

How To Make Bamboo Candles

Bamboo candles
Bamboo candles are easily-made and beautiful alternatives to the standard homemade candles.  Forget the wine bottles and dripping wax and melting down crayons!  Create your own bamboo candles to accompany a romantic bamboo mealor to use when you slip into your cozy Ari Yoga Pants and spend some time meditating by their natural glow.  They also make unique centerpieces for an upcoming eco-friendly wedding!
Here’s what you need to make your bamboo candles:
  • Bamboo canes, roughly  6 inches in diameter
  • Saw
  • Wax
  • Double Boiler
  • Large wick with metal tab
Here’s how to make your bamboo candles:
  1. Use the saw to cut the bamboo canes to differing lengths.  Make sure they have level bottoms!
  2. Melt wax in a double boiler.
  3. Once melted, pour 2 inches of wax into the bamboo cane.
  4. Immediately insert the wick into the bamboo candle.
  5. Let the wax harden.
  6. Fill the remaining area of the bamboo cane with wax.
  7. Let the wax cool for 4 hours before using.
  8. Before using, trim the wax to ¼ inch.
For more creative do-it-yourself ideas, visit Green Earth News’ Bamboo Crafts section!

Stay Cool This Summer: How To Make A Bamboo Fan!

An old saying goes that no fan can create a cool breeze unless it is soaked with the maker’s sweat.  And while some amazing bamboo fans can take almost 100 days to complete between picking the perfect bamboo pieces and hand painting intricate designs, there are easier methods to creating not-quite-so-spectacular-but-equally-effective hand-powered cooling systems.
Here’s what you need to make your bamboo fan:
  • 14 x 17 in. sheets of paper (pick fun colors or patterns!)
  • 11 12-inch long bamboo sticks
  • Sharpie/Marker
  • 2 inch headpin
  • Needle
  • Thread (not too thick but not too thin either)
  • Needle nose pliers
  • Scissors
  • Tape
  • Glue
Here’s how to make your bamboo fan:
  1. Start by creating the bones of the fan.  Mark the middle of the sticks (width wise) and one inch from the one end of each of the sticks (the same end please!).
  2. Use the needle to create holes through the marks on the middle of the bamboo sticks.
  3. Thread the sticks together through the newly-created holes in the middle.  Pull the bamboo together as if the fan were in a closed position.  (Hint:  If you wanted to decorate and/or paint the bones of the fan, now is the time to do so!)
  4. Thread the head pin back through the holes.  Using the needle nose pliers, twist the other end of the head pin just tight enough to keep the bones together but loose enough to allow for pivoting.  Trim any extra thread with scissors.
  5. Spread the paper out and set the bamboo bones evenly down on the paper.  Tape the bones to the paper.
  6. Mark the paper ½ inch above the top of the bones and 1 inch on each side.  Cut the bottom and top of the paper in an arc.  (If you wish, remove the bones carefully to paint or draw designs on the paper.)
  7. Glue the bones to the paper and let dry completely.
  8. To fold the fan, start on one end and begin folding by bringing the first bone to the second bone and folding the paper in.  Continue to fold in this manner and once done, trim any excess paper.